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LIMEHOUSE
Description and History from 1868 Gazetteer

LIMEHOUSE, a parish and suburb of London, in the Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county Middlesex, 3 miles E. of St. Paul's, London. It is a station on the London and Blackwall railway. The parish is situated on the Thames at Limehouse Reach, including part of Ratcliff, and is comprised within the metropolitan borough of the Tower Hamlets.

It is approached from London by the Commercial-road, and is traversed by the Blackwall railway, the Regent's canal, and Lea Cut. In ancient records it is called Limehurst, or the Lime-Grove, and formed part of Stepney till 1730, when it was constituted a distinct parish. Here are the Limehouse, Regent's, and Lea Cut docks, also Huddart's patent rope factory, 1,200 feet long, and the Stepney union poorhouse. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of London, value 714, in the patronage of Brasenose College, Oxford. The church, dedicated to St. Anne, is a massive Grecian structure, after designs by Hawkesmoor, being one of the 50 churches built by Queen Anne. It was much damaged by fire in 1850. There are also two district churches, viz: St. John's, and one at Ratcliffe, the livings of both which are perpetual curacies;* value 175 and 300. Several of the Dissenting bodies have places of worship. There is a foundation school with an income from endowment of 190 per annum, also National and other schools. Limehouse Reach extends for near 2 miles in the river Thames from N. to S., and has a depth of water from 10 to 16 feet. On the eastern shore are the West India docks, Millwall, Seaward's and other works; and on the western the Commercial and East Country docks, Deptford, and numerous timber, lime, and other yards.

[Description(s) from "The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland" (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson 2003]
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[Last updated on 9 Oct 2003 by David Hawgood. 2003]